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Business: 10 Simple Steps to Conflict Resolutions

Business: 10 Simple Steps to Conflict Resolutions 

One of the most common and frustrating impediments to worker productivity is conflict between employees. Unresolved conflict can strain relationships, create tension and negativity, and dampen morale. Whether engaged in a heated debate, a disagreement, or an outright feud, take a strategic approach to resolving the problem. You'll be most effective if you avoid making these common mistakes.

1. Don't make assumptions about the situation or the other person's perceptions, motivations, or reactions. You'll get a much clearer and more accurate picture by asking the other person directly.

2. Don't take it personally - it rarely is!

3. Don't look for blame. Instead, try to identify cause.

4. Don't avoid the problem. It'll only get worse, breed resentment, and resurface at a later date. You've simply got to deal directly with the issue at hand.

​​ 5. Don't attack the other person's character. That's just playing dirty. It will not help you work things out and it will almost certainly have a lasting, negative impact.

6. Don't gossip about the problem or about the other person involved. It's unprofessional and will only make matters worse.

 7. Don't bring it up in public. This is a private matter to be resolved between you and the other party.

8. Don't bring it up when there's not enough time to address it. Instead, leave adequate time for a thorough discussion - or introduce the issue and schedule a time to resume talks in the immediate future.

9. Don't bring it up when you're angry, stressed, or feeling ill.That's a disservice to you and the other person involved. Wait until you're calm.

10. Don't address the situation in an email. Email leaves far too much room for misinterpretation. While we're on the subject, don't copy others on a personal matter. This will almost certainly make the other party feel defensive, angry, or humiliated. It won't, however, help resolve the problem.
 
Shabbar Suterwala
"Bridging the Gap between what you are and what you can be"
Soft Skills Trainer, Business Coach,NLP Practitioner
Personal, Psychological & Martial Counsellor & Coach 

Whatsapp / IMO:  +91-9892225864

http://www.shabbarsuterwala.com 

"The More you Share the More you Get, the More you Grow"

Parenting Tips: Parents & Child Attention & Concentration

Psychologists found the first direct connection between how long a parent pays attention and the impact this has on their child's concentration.

Parents who look at their phones or get distracted when playing with their children may raise youngsters with short attention spans, research suggests.

Psychologists said they have found the first direct connection between how long a parent pays attention to a toy and the impact this has on their child's concentration.

The study, published in the journal Current Biology, has implications for how a child goes on to perform at school, they added.

"When you've got someone who isn't responsive to a child's behaviour, it could be a real red flag for future problems"

Dr Chen Yu - The experts tracked the eye movements of 36 parents and their one-year-old children by using head-mounted cameras.

They did not tell parents what they were looking for in order to ensure they were as natural as possible with their children.

The study, from experts at Indiana University, showed that the longer a parent, and therefore their baby, paid attention to an object while playing, the longer the baby kept paying attention to it, even after a parent stopped.
The shortest attention spans in babies were among those whose parents got distracted and looked elsewhere, or sat back and did not play along.

The researchers also found that parents who tried to direct play - such as by holding out toys and naming them - had children with lower attention spans than those who let their children take the lead with playing.

The study found the longer a parent paid attention to an object while playing, the longer the baby kept paying attention to it.

Dr Chen Yu, who led the study, said: "The ability of children to sustain attention is known as a strong indicator for later success in areas such as language acquisition, problem-solving and other key cognitive development milestones.

"Caregivers who appear distracted or whose eyes wander a lot while their children play appear to negatively impact infants' burgeoning attention spans during a key stage of development.

"When you've got someone who isn't responsive to a child's behaviour, it could be a real red flag for future problems."

He said parents could "support and train" children to sustain attention through showing an interest in what their child is playing with.

"Because sustained attention matters to school success, this influence provides a way to understand individual differences in sustained attention and to potentially influence its development."

Dr Linda Smith, co-author of the study, said: "Our study is one of the first to consider attention as impacted by social interaction. It really appears to be an activity performed by two social partners since our study shows one individual's attention significantly influences another's." How to Build Trust to empower relations

Dr Yu said a lot of parents in the study who did play with their children were "trying too hard" and directing play.
"They were trying to show off their parenting skills, holding out toys for their kids and naming the objects. But when you watch the camera footage, you can actually see the children's eyes wandering to the ceilings or over their parents' shoulders -- they're not paying attention at all."

Parents who had more success were those who let their children take the lead.

"These caregivers waited until they saw the children express interest in a toy and then jumped in to expand that interest by naming the object and encouraging play," he said. Why Children Misbehave And How To Deal With Them" The responsive parents were sensitive to their children's interests and then supported their attention."

When both parents and babies paid attention to a toy for more than 3.6 seconds, babies then continued looking at the object for 2.6 more seconds on average. This is four times longer than those whose parents lost interest in the toy. 18 Ways to Make Your Parents Feel Great Dr Yu said that when these extra seconds are magnified over a play session - and those play sessions occur daily for months during a critical stage in mental development - the effect is significant.

Dr Smith added: "This effect, day in and day out in an infant's life, may be the source of strong skills in sustained attention and concentration."
 
Shabbar Suterwala
"Bridging the Gap between what you are and what you can be"
Soft Skills Trainer, Business Coach,NLP Practitioner
Personal, Psychological & Martial Counsellor & Coach 

Whatsapp / IMO:  +91-9892225864

http://www.shabbarsuterwala.com 

"The More you Share the More you Get, the More you Grow"